Kentucky Virtual High School
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KVHS 2002/2003 Course Catalog


Studying Online with KVHS




Student Qualifications

In general, students registering for Kentucky Virtual High School courses should be self-motivated and good independent learners. Because these courses are web-based, students should have basic keyboarding skills and be comfortable with getting online, using email, and using a word processor. Specific content knowledge prerequisites are found in each course description.

Most KVHS courses are structured for grades 9 -12, but are open to qualified middle school students with the recommendation of their school and approval of the course instructor. (See "High School Credit Earned in Middle Grades," Kentucky Program of Studies.) 

Who Is “Most Likely to Succeed?”

Students who are successful in online courses generally have the following characteristics:
Solid academic preparation - The student should have successfully completed the prerequisite coursework. Because all courses contain essay and open response components, students should have basic mastery of writing and analytical skills as well.

  • Access to technology – The student should have regularly scheduled access to an internet-connected computer that meets KVHS’s minimum technical requirements (see Technical Information at www.kvhs.org). Most often, this means a period of the school day when the student is guaranteed uninterrupted access to a computer. Students may also access their courses from home computers and any other relatively new internet-connected computer to which they have regular access, such as those in public libraries.
  • Time and opportunity to study – To be successful, students must have regularly scheduled time and opportunity to study and the self-discipline to stick to the schedule they establish. This often requires balancing competing priorities among the online course and extra-curricular activities. We strongly recommend that students have a specific class period during the day assigned for the KVHS course and additional time set aside for study at home. Students in Advanced Placement courses, especially, will need to schedule at least twelve hours per week for their course (about six hours online and six hours of offline study).
  • Students who value success – Successful students in online courses have strong motivation and commitment. Because there is no “back row” in online classes a student must be an active participant in all course activities, participating in class discussions and getting small group work done on time. Successful online students are generally very determined students who like to set their own goals and challenge themselves to meet them.
  • Strong support from school and home – Students taking online courses are usually doing something “new;” that is, they may be the only online learner or at least among a small group of students who are learning in a different way for the first time. In many cases, the online course may be the most rigorous course in the student’s schedule. Support from the school and from home will be very important as students balance competing priorities for time and face frequent deadlines. Students are far more likely to succeed if they have encouragement from adults who acknowledge the challenge and support the effort

The Role of the School Contact

Schools make it possible for students to take Kentucky Virtual High School courses because the school is the final approval point in the registration process. However, registration is only the first part of the process of learning online. Schools have important roles to play throughout the course; the role most crucial to student success is that of the school contact.
Identifying the School Contact – After a student has been approved for a course, the Kentucky Virtual High School will ask that a School Contact be named. Schools may identify the same individual for all KVHS students, or name more than one individual if there are several students enrolled in different courses. The contact has no responsibilities for grading and so does not have to be a teacher but should be someone who will take responsibility for supporting the student throughout the course and communicating with the KVHS teacher.

KVHS will need the name, title, mailing address, phone and email of the school contact(s).

The school contact will have KVHS log-in credentials so that s/he may familiarize themselves with the course and log in to check student progress and activity logs. 

The responsibilities of the school contact are:

  • Making sure that the student has regularly scheduled access to an internet computer
  • Ensuring that the student has the required textbooks or other instructional materials before class begins. This includes:
    • Ensuring that the school procures any texts or other required materials that are needed and giving them to the student
    • Receiving any instructional materials that are mailed by KVHS to the school to be given to the student 
  • Receiving progress reports and grades from the KVHS teacher
  • Communicating with the KVHS teacher on an as-needed basis (email and phone) 
  • Proctoring certain assessments (usually only the final exam)
  • Being KVHS’s first point of contact for any online disciplinary issues
  • Encouraging, coaching, and generally being a caring advocate for the online student!

Required Materials and Textbooks

Public schools awarding credit to a public school student for a course taken through the Kentucky Virtual High School are responsible for purchasing the required textbook(s) and other instructional materials. Required Materials and Textbooks noted in this catalog are not included in the course fee. 

Questions about this policy may be addressed to Textbook Coordinator, Curriculum Development, Kentucky Department of Education, 502.564.2106.

 

Table Of Contents

Table Of Contents

English/Language Arts

Health

Science

Languages

Mathematics

Social Studies

Vocational Education

Advanced Placement

Professional Development

 

English/Language Arts

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Program of Studies


Four credits of English are required for high school graduation. These courses are English English II, English III, English IV, and I, taken in sequence, as each is a prerequisite to the next. A local board of education may substitute an integrated, applied, interdisciplinary, or higher level course for a required course if the alternative course provides rigorous content and addresses the same academic expectations.

 

English I

This course follows the traditional model for English I as articulated in the Program of Studies. English I uses an overview of all types of literary genres, as well as informational reading, such as biographies, autobiographies, periodicals, and essays. Instruction correlates to the five required areas of the language arts: reading; writing; inquiry; speaking, listening, observing, and, using technology for communication.

Guiding questions include:
· What roles do heroes play in our society?
· What are the dreams of youth and what happens as a result of those dreams?
· What makes people and cultures unique?

In addition to readings from the required text, there will be outside reading assigned in the form of novels that students may find at the local library or through the Kentucky Virtual Library (www.kyvl.org). Students may be asked to view a movie or video that complements the text work. Along with the literature, there will be grammar and mechanics work, vocabulary, and writing, writing, writing. The writing and reading requirements of the KY Program of Studies are aligned to this course. Most major writing assignments will be suitable and appropriate for the Kentucky Writing Program.

Recommended Preparation

The student should have successfully completed the Middle Level English/Language Arts content outlined in the Kentucky Program of Studies.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· The Language of Literature, McDougal Littell, Grade 9 ISBN: 0-395-93186-X
· Language Network, Grade 9. ISBN: 0-395-967-739-2 (Grammar, Writing, Communication)

Availability

English I is a full credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters. English I is available in a traditional year-long format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester).

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose English IA.
· To register for only the second semester, choose English IB.
· To register for the year-long format, choose English I Full-Year.
· To register for a block format, chose English IAB.


English III

English III covers American literature from the early 1600s through the 20th century. Students discuss different genres of writing including prose and poetry, short stories, novels and American drama. The readings include several classics selected by the student and teacher. During the course students discuss the elements of literature in the virtual classroom with other students and write and emulate the many elements of the literature studied. This includes the writing style, choice of words/semantics and the story itself.
Students will:
· Describe and analyze two different pieces of American literature
· Summarize and name the works of the major writers of each time period
· Match major authors with their works
· Demonstrate effective writing skills using correct grammar and proper spelling.
The writing and reading requirements of the KY Program of Studies are aligned to this course. Most major writing assignments will be suitable and appropriate for the Kentucky Writing Program.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have successfully completed English I and English II content as outlined in the Kentucky Program of Studies. English/Language Arts must be taken in sequence, as each is a prerequisite to the next.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Elements of Literature, 5th Course, Literature of the United States, 1997 edition, by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Order Number # H96833-X

Availability

English III is a full credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters. English III is available in a traditional yearlong format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester).

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose English IIIA.
· To register for only the second semester, choose English IIIB.
· To register for the year-long format, choose English III Full-Year
· To register for a block format, chose English IIIAB.


English IV

Senior English is an integrated study of literature and language arts skills. This course emphasizes British literature in both a chronological and a thematic manner. The units move ahead from the early Anglo-Saxons to the romanticism of the 18th century. Along with the British selections, students read world literature relating to the individual themes outlined in the text.

Kentucky's Program of Studies requires that students not only demonstrate skill in reading literary forms, but those skills of informational and practical workplace reading as well. Students may be asked to read articles in a current magazine or newspaper, along with demonstrating skills in reading graphs, charts, and diagrams. The writing component of this course includes personal and reflective writing, literary writing, writing critical analyses, writing to learn, writing to demonstrate learning, and transactive writing. Writing pieces will be assigned that will be suitable for inclusion in the Kentucky Writing Portfolio, 12th grade level. Because this is an integrated course, skills in mechanics, grammar, usage will be taught in conjunction with this component. Outside reading will take the form of choosing additional selections from the text for a good part of the semester. This text offers a wide selection of multi-cultural writers, current best sellers, contemporary non-fiction, poetry, book reviews, etc. You will be asked to share your outside reading with us through a variety of technological ways.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have successfully completed English I, English II and English III content as outlined in the Kentucky Program of Studies. English/Language Arts must be taken in sequence, as each is a prerequisite to the next.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· The Language of Literature: British Literature, McDougal Littell. ISBN: 0-395-93182-7

Availability

English IV is a full credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters. English IV is available in a traditional year-long format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester).

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose English IVA.
· To register for only the second semester, choose English IVB.
· To register for the year-long format, choose English IV Full-Year.
· To register for a block format, chose English IVAB.


Introduction to Creative Writing


Introduction to Creative Writing is an elective course that engages students in a variety of writing activities: vignettes; short stories; poems; and final folio. This course is designed for those individuals who want to learn not only new ways to write, but also new ways to think about writing.

In this class, students will write at least one vignette, two 5 - 8 page short stories, and approximately 5-10 poems during the semester. These writings will be subject to both instructor and peer evaluation. Of these pieces, one short story and two other pieces of writing (student's choice) will be submitted in the final folio. Students will be responsible for completing a series of smaller preliminary writing exercises in both fiction and poetry. All exercises will be done either through email or threaded discussion in order to simulate in-class writing exercises. Students will critique the short stories and poems of other students in the class. Students will submit threaded discussion responses on weekly readings. Students will submit an end-of-semester folio containing the three entries listed above and a one-page reflective letter.

Recommended Preparation

While there are no course prerequisites, students should have demonstrated interest in improving their abilities to write in a variety of forms and for multiple audiences and purposes.

Required Textbooks

There is no required text for this course. Instead, students will be use specific websites, the school library, and the Kentucky Virtual Library (www.kyvl.org) to access course readings and other materials.

Availability

Introduction to Creative Writing is a one-semester elective course typically taught for one-half credit. The course is offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters.

Honors Option: With approval of the instructor, schools may request that the course be taught in a two-semester, whole credit format as an advanced or honors course for students who demonstrate exceptional individuals who want to learn not only new ways to write, but also new ways to think about writing.


 

Health

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General Health and Wellness

A one-half credit elective, "Health and Wellness" begins by giving the student an overall understanding of Health and Wellness and quality of life. Students discuss making responsible decisions and learn about their bodies and how best to care for them. Students also discuss mental health, as well as physical health and discuss the different growth levels; including adolescence, adulthood, marriage and parenthood. By the end of the course, students will have a good understanding not only of what health and wellness is, but how to attain it through everyday living experiences. Students will: o List, identify and discuss elements of Health and Wellness and quality of life. o Demonstrate through writing, mastery of fundamentals of health and wellness. o Analyze and discuss different elements of health and wellness with students and the Instructor. o Formulate and plan for health and wellness in regards to their own lives.

Recommended Preparation

Required Textbooks

  • Health, by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Books may be ordered through the publisher. Student Edition. ISBN: 0030511232.

Course Source

Intelligent Education, Inc.


 

Science

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Program of Studies

High school students will continue concrete hands-on science experiences that require a minds-on approach. These concrete experiences will be developed into abstract concepts appropriate for high school students. For example, the properties of substances that students directly observed in grades P-8 can now be related to the structure of substances that cannot be directly observed (e.g., atomic and molecular structure). Another example is that the study of astronomy moves from the solar system to the universe.  High school students’ use of scientific inquiry will become more extensive (e.g., the study of the universe will be based on observational evidence, science concepts, and logic). They will develop a conceptual understanding of science rather than knowing a number of unrelated facts. They also will gain knowledge and abilities in applying and connecting scientific concepts to real life.

All students are required to take three credits of science in order to graduate from high school. The three science credits shall contain the physical, earth/space, and life science concepts.

Physics

The goal of Physics is to provide students with an appreciation and understanding of the physical world. An equally important goal is to prepare students for college courses and careers that require an understanding of physics. One essential tool in developing an understanding of physical principles is mathematics. Mathematical descriptions of motion, force, energy, electricity, magnetism, and light allow us to describe what we observe and predict what we have yet to observe in the most efficient manner possible.

Students watch daily lectures on videotape. Most phenomena are illustrated in these lessons through demonstration and/or animation. Students also learn from labs and activities on the Physics Companion CD-ROM, participate in hands-on lab activities, and take frequent short tests. Daily homework is graded by computer, with immediate feedback provided. Students may re-try any homework until they achieve success. The teacher is available by phone and e-mail to offer assistance.

Physics students will:
· Use appropriate technology in the acquisition of data.  Collect, organize, and display experimental data in the form of tables and graphs.
· Perform investigations of physical principles using written instructions or methods of their own creation.
· Use various models that have been found useful in understanding matter and energy.
· Analyze and describe phenomena using the mathematics of vectors.
· Predict the behaviors of objects using Newton's laws.
· Apply conservation laws in problem solving.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have mastered the content for Algebra I and Algebra II.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Physics Principles & Problems, Glencoe/Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, ISBN #0-02-825-4732.

Availability

Physics is a full credit course offered in the Fall and Spring.  Physics is available in a traditional year-long format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester).

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Physics A.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Physics B.
· To register for the year-long format, choose Physics Full-Year.
· To register for a block format, chose Physics AB.


Chemistry

Chemistry is designed for high school students who are preparing for college and need a strong basis in chemistry. The course emphasizes chemical reactions in the earlier chapters and more abstract material on orbitals in later chapters. Students discuss the chemical nature of matter and theoretical intricacies of atoms and orbitals. Students also use the virtual classroom to discuss and view classroom demonstrations and laboratory experiments.

Problem solving is strongly emphasized during the course and students spend considerable time guiding themselves to an understanding of the importance of learning chemistry and its
relationship to everyday life. Required laboratory Internet-based Activities are included with each lesson, taking about 1 hour to complete. Additional laboratory assignments are included for enrichment.:

Chemistry students will:
· Define and apply chemistry concepts to real world problems.
· Describe and discuss chemistry concepts in the virtual classroom.
· Use appropriate technology in the study and application of chemistry.
· Construct, observe and participate in experiments using chemistry concepts.
· Compare and contrast different chemistry concepts and propose and analyze their application to real life situations.
· Demonstrate mastery of chemistry concepts and principles.

Recommended Preparation


It is recommended that students complete Algebra I before participating in this course.

Required Textbooks

Text currently under review.  To Be Announced.

Availability

Chemistry is a full credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters.  Chemistry is available in a traditional year-long format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester).

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Chemistry A.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Chemistry B.
· To register for the year-long format, choose Chemistry Full-Year.
· To register for the block format, choose Chemistry AB.


Biology

During the course students study humans and how they interact with their environment. They also discover the elements of the environment, animals, plants, vertebrates and invertebrates that make up this world. Students start at a global level and progress to the molecular level. The course outline encompasses the following: the total environment; human growth and heredity; plant adaptations; natural resource conservation; viruses; mitosis; and different types of animals.

Biology students will:
· Identify, explain, describe and apply Biology concepts to real themes and activities.
· Use appropriate technology in the study and application of Biology.
· Demonstrate mastery of Biology concepts and principles.
· Integrate learning from other subjects and courses into their Biology learning.
· Investigate and analyze biological phenomena in the world around them.

Required Textbooks


The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Biology: The Living Science, Miller and Levine, Prentice Hall, 1998, ISBN 0134155637.

Availability

 Biology is a full credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters.  Biology is available in a traditional yearlong format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester).

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Biology A.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Biology B.
· To register for the year-long format, choose Biology Full-Year.
· To register for a block format, chose Biology AB.


Earth and Space Science

This course examines the nature of science and uses different strategies to explore topics from the earth’s interior to the outermost regions of the universe. Students will investigate the fundamental processes of the earth and space. Information derived from the disciplines of astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography are examined and applied to the understanding of natural phenomena and their impact to society and the environment. Each new lesson will build from previous material to portray how the different deep space and earth systems work together to influence all life.

The course is divided into five sections:
· Unit 1 - Nature Of Science
· Unit 2 - Energy In Earth Systems
· Unit 3 - Biogeochemical Cycles
· Unit 4 - Formation and Ongoing Changes of the Universe
· Unit 5 - Formation and Ongoing Changes of the Earth System

The course is offered with three options. Note that if the student is placed in either the A or B half-credit class, the course will contain the Unit on the Nature of Science:

Earth and Space Science 1 - Earth and Space Science contains all five units

Earth and Space Science 1A   - Earth Science (.5 credit in one semester) - Includes Units 1, 2 and 3. This course examines the nature of science and uses different strategies to explore topics from the earth’s interior to the atmosphere. Students will investigate the fundamental processes of all earth systems. Information derived from the disciplines of astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography are examined and applied to the understanding of natural phenomena and their impact to society and the environment. Each new lesson will build from previous material to portray how the different earth systems work together to influence all life.

Earth and Space Science 1B   - Introduction to Earth and Space Science (.5 credit in one semester) Includes Units 1, 4, and 5. This course examines the nature of science and uses different strategies to explore topics from the formation of our universe to the ever-changing earth. Students will investigate the fundamental processes of the big bang theory to the evolution of planet earth. Information derived from the disciplines of astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography are examined and applied to the understanding of natural phenomena and how the earth, sun and moon have changed over time. Each new lesson will build from previous material to portray the current view of the earth within our universe.

Required Textbooks

No text required.

Availability

See description of options above.

· To register for Earth Space Science I in a block format, choose Earth Space Science IAB.
· To register for Earth Space Science in a yearlong format, choose the Full Year option.
· To register for Earth Space Science IA, choose Earth Space Science IA.
· To register for Earth Space Science IB, choose Earth Space Science IB.


 

Languages

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Program of Studies

In an increasingly interdependent world, dealing with the international market and developing cross-cultural understanding are paramount. Second language study plays a vital role in preparing students for living in a global society. Academic Expectations 2.27 and 2.28 state that students will recognize and understand the similarities and differences among languages, and understand and communicate in a second language. Elementary and middle school second language programs, particularly full or partial immersion programs, capitalize on the natural capacities of children to imitate and assimilate the sound and structural system of a language. Although single or multi-language exploration programs of short or long duration do not stress language skills, they do build cultural awareness. Secondary programs may either build on previous learning or initiate new knowledge.

The curricular framework of a second language program encompasses five organizing principles: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.
· Communicating in a language other than English is central to second language study, whether that communication is in the form of conversation, writing, or through the reading of literature.
· Mastery of the language cannot be achieved without a knowledge and understanding of the cultures in which it is used. The understanding of the perspectives and beliefs of other cultures greatly improves students' abilities to function in a global environment.
· The study of second languages offers connections to other content areas, thus allowing students opportunities to reinforce their learning and skills in other disciplines.
· Second language study provides insights into students' native languages and culture. Through comparisons of other cultural and linguistic systems, the study of second languages helps students develop critical thinking skills.
· Knowledge of other languages and cultures prepares students for life and work in multilingual and multicultural communities.

Spanish I

In this course, students will begin a journey toward Spanish acquisition in which the final goal is to communicate. The course is designed with thematic units that enable students to connect

 The goals of this course are:
· To enable students to understand spoken Spanish language in a variety of natural language settings;
· To offer students the opportunity to practice listening, reading, speaking, and writing Spanish;
· To offer students the opportunity to practice pronunciation by listening to audio clips, as well as recording and listening to their own voice;
· To offer students the opportunity to optimize awareness of the different Spanish cultures and therefore to appreciate and respect their differences;
· To offer students the opportunity to enhance study skills through management of language acquisition.

The class is divided into weekly units. In each unit students have exercises, reading and listening comprehension activities, writing assignments, audio material, and Power Point presentations to help learn the material contained in the unit. Each week students read and study specific pages in the textbook. Each week students are asked to do various reading and/or writing assignments in their journal for practice of reading and writing skills. Spelling, punctuation, and correctness of expression are important in the journal. Each week students are given words, conversations or passages to read and record for the instructor. The threaded discussion area is the students online Spanish chat area. Using what they have learned each week, students communicate in Spanish and respond to the postings of their classmates. Students submit a minimum number of webliography entries pertaining to the countries of Spain, Argentina, and Peru or to Hispanic culture, language or history. Students have several exams during each semester.

Required Textbooks


The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Paso a Paso: Level 1, Addison Wesley Longman, (January 1997) Prentice Hall School Group; ISBN: 0673216691, and accompanying student CD/ROM, Scott Foresman, Pasos Vivos 1.

Availability

Spanish I is a full credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters. Spanish is available in a traditional year-long format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester) in Fall or Spring. The block format is not available in Summer.

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Spanish IA.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Spanish IB.
· To register for the year-long format, choose Spanish I Full-Year.
· To register for a block format, chose Spanish IAB.


Spanish II

In this course, students continue their journey toward Spanish language acquisition in which the final goal is to communicate. The course is designed with thematic units that enable students to connect learning with real life situations. Spanish II follows the format of KVHS Spanish I.

The goals of this course are:
· To enable students to understand spoken Spanish language in a variety of natural language settings;
· To offer students the opportunity to practice listening, reading, speaking, and writing Spanish;
· To offer students the opportunity to practice pronunciation by listening to audio clips, as well as recording and listening to their own voice;
· To offer students the opportunity to optimize awareness of the different Spanish cultures and therefore to appreciate and respect their differences;
· To offer students the opportunity to enhance study skills through management of language acquisition.

The class is divided into weekly units. In each unit students have exercises, reading and listening comprehension activities, writing assignments, audio material, and Power Point presentations to help learn the material contained in the unit. Each week students read and study specific pages in the textbook. Each week students are asked to do various reading and/or writing assignments in their journal for practice of reading and writing skills. Spelling, punctuation, and correctness of expression are important in the journal. Each week students are given words, conversations or passages to read and record for the instructor. The threaded discussion area is the students online Spanish chat area. Using what they have learned each week, students communicate in Spanish and respond to the postings of their classmates. Students submit a minimum number of webliography entries pertaining to the countries of Spain, Argentina, and Peru or to Hispanic culture, language or history. Students have several exams during each semester.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have successfully completed Spanish I.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Paso a Paso: Level 2, Addison Wesley Longman, (January 1997) Prentice Hall School Group; ISBN: 0673216705.

Availability

Spanish II is a full credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters. Spanish is available in a traditional year-long format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester) in Fall or Spring. The block format is not available in Summer.

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Spanish IIA.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Spanish IIB.
· To register for the year-long format, choose Spanish II Full-Year.
· To register for a block format, chose Spanish IIAB.


German I

Hallo!  Do you recognize these German words:  Auto, Kindergarten, Garten, Jeans?  German and English are related languages. Students in this course will use video, audio, telephone, and the Internet to help them learn the basic skills of communicating in the German language.

The interactive, multi-media approach engages students in mastering the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.  The course content is delivered via CD-ROM. The instructor integrates the Annenberg video series Fokus Deutsch and its accompanying textbook / workbook materials to present students with an authentic picture of the language and culture of the German-speaking countries. The goals of the course are aligned with the National Standards for Foreign Language Teaching.

Written tests and projects will be mailed for grading. Fifteen-minute conversation lessons, delivered via telephone, are required each week. These lessons are scheduled between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday. 

Recommended Preparation

None. Although German I is typically taught at the high school level, the course is also available to highly motivated 7th and 8th graders.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Auf Deutsch!, Level 1, Pupil's Edition, McDougal Littell, ISBN: #0-618-02961-3, Title Code: 2-91176.
· Auf Deutsch!, Level 1, Workbook - Pupil's Edition, McDougal Littell, ISBN: #0-618-02967-2, Title Code: 2-91182.
· Klett Political Map of Germany - International Book Service, Inc. ISBN: #3-623-00282-8

Students should have access to a German-English/English-German dictionary of choice.

Availability

German I is a full credit course offered in the Fall and Spring. Latin is available in a traditional yearlong format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester) in Fall or Spring.

· To register only for the first semester of the two-semester course, select German IA
· To register only for the second semester of the two-semester course, select German IB
· To register for the block format, select German IAB
· To register for the yearlong format, select the Full Year option


German II

Grüß Euch!  Did you know that many European countries use German as their primary language?  In the German II course, students will maintain and build upon the concepts learned in German I to improve their communication skills.  Using the multimedia approach established in German I,  students will continue their study of the diverse German culture and its speakers.

The course content is delivered via CD-ROM. The instructor integrates the Annenberg video series Fokus Deutsch and its accompanying textbook / workbook materials to present students with an authentic picture of the language and culture of the German-speaking countries. The goals of the course are aligned with the National Standards for Foreign Language Teaching.

Written tests and projects will be mailed for grading. Fifteen-minute conversation lessons, delivered via telephone, are required each week. These lessons are scheduled between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday.  

Recommended Preparation

Successful completion of German I via KVHS or KET or approval of the KVHS teacher is required.  Call Frau Styles at 1-800-333-9764 for approval.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Auf Deutsch!, Level 2, Pupil's Edition, McDougal Littell, ISBN: #0-618-02962-1, Title Code: 2-91177.
· Auf Deutsch!, Level 2, Workbook - Pupil's Edition, McDougal Littell, ISBN: #0-618-02968-0, Title Code: 2-91183.
· Klett Political Map of Germany - International Book Service, Inc., ISBN: #3-623-00282-8

Students should have access to a German-English/English-German dictionary of choice.

Availability

German II is a full credit course offered in the Fall and Spring. Latin is available in a traditional yearlong format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester) in Fall or Spring.

· To register only for the first semester of the two-semester course, select German IIA
· To register only for the second semester of the two-semester course, select German IIB
· To register for the block format, select German IIAB
· To register for the yearlong format, select the Full Year option


German III

Was gibt's Neues?  Did you know Germany is the largest market in Europe and the third largest market worldwide for telecommunication products?  In the German III course, students continue to develop and expand their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at a higher level of difficulty. They will review many of the language patterns learned in the first two levels of study. An understanding of the cultures of the German-speaking countries and their people continues to be an integral component of the content. This fosters a respect and appreciation for the diversity of cultures in general.

In this accelerated course, the instructor continues to integrate the Annenberg video series Fokus Deutsch and its accompanying textbook / workbook materials to present students with an authentic picture of the language and culture of the German-speaking countries. The interactive and multi-media approach is maintained at this level. The goals of the course are aligned with the National Standards for Foreign Language Teaching.

Written tests and projects will be mailed for grading. Fifteen-minute conversation lessons, delivered via telephone, are required each week. These lessons are scheduled between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday. 

Recommended Preparation

Successful completion of German II via KVHS or KET or approval of the KVHS teacher is required.  Call Frau Styles at 1-800-333-9764 for approval.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.                                 
· Fokus Deutsch, Intermediate German (Student Edition), McGraw-Hill, ISBN: #0-07-233660-9.
· Perspektive aus Deutschland, Short texts and stories for Intermediate Students of German, ISBN: #0-8442-2290-9, Order No.: WC2290-9.
· Workbook/Lab Manual Fokus Deutsch Intermediate German, cGraw-Hill, ISBN: #0-07-027602-1.

Students must have access to:
· English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition, The Olivia and Hill Press, ISBN: #0-934034-31-1.
· Klett Political Map of Germany, International Book Service, Inc., ISBN: #3-623-00282-8.
· A German-English/English-German dictionary of choice.

Availability

German III is a full credit course offered in the Fall and Spring. Latin is available in a traditional yearlong format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester) in Fall or Spring.

· To register only for the first semester of the two-semester course, select German IIIA
· To register only for the second semester of the two-semester course, select German IIIB
· To register for the block format, select German IIIAB
· To register for the yearlong format, select the Full Year option


Latin I

Students receive instruction via CDs prepared by the teacher and mailed with other pertinent materials at the beginning of the course. Each student also purchases from the textbook company listed below, Ecce Romani Book I textbook and accompanied Activity Book IA.

During the course, students will study the vocabulary and structures of Latin in a way that will improve their ability to decode English words and their understanding of the English language while preparing them to study other languages. Mythology and an overview of Roman contributions to Western civilization are stressed. This background often improves performance on achievement tests.
Students learn Latin by actually reading it and discovering for themselves the shapes of words, the structures of grammar, and vocabularies. The story line follows the daily life and adventures of the Cornelii, a typical Roman family in the years A.D. 80-81, and the readings familiarize students with Roman culture at the same time that they build rapid facility with the Latin language.

The course offers study of the Latin language, incorporating listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, word building, English derivatives, Roman culture, and classical mythology.

Through taking this course, students will:
· Read aloud the Latin of ancient authors with confidence.
· Demonstrate comprehension of grammatical aspects of Latin and English.
· Develop listening skills and speaking for patterned Latin passages.
· Develop an appreciation of classical mythology of Greece and Rome.
· Develop an awareness of the culture of the ancient Romans, its historic significance, and its contemporary relevance.
· Demonstrate an enhancement of general language skills.
· Increase vocabulary through a knowledge of the origin and derivation of words.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Ecce Romani Level I, Student Book, Addison-Wesley Longman, ISBN #0-8013-1201-9, Order No.: 79725.
· Ecce Romani Student Language Activity Book I-A, Addison-Wesley Longman, ISBN: #0-8013-1209-4, Order No.: 79733.

Students must also have regular access to a Greco-Roman mythology book and a Latin English dictionary. If students wish to purchase these books, the following are recommended:
· Myths and Their Meaning, Prentice-Hall, ISBN #0-205-08437-0.
· A Latin & English Dictionary. Suggested: The New College Latin & English Dictionary, AMSCO School Publications, Inc., ISBN #0-87720-561-2.  Order No. R617P.

Availability

Latin I is a full credit course offered in the Fall and Spring. Latin is available in a traditional yearlong format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester) in Fall or Spring.

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Latin IA.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Latin IB.
· To register for a block format, choose Latin IAB.
· To register for the yearlong format, choose Latin I Full Year.


Latin II

During this course, students will receive instruction via CDs prepared by the teacher and mailed with other pertinent materials at the beginning of the course.  Each student also purchases from the textbook company listed below  Ecce Romani Book II and Pompeiiana Newsletter.

The goal of this course is to build on the knowledge and skill acquired in level I.  Students apply deductive reasoning skills to learn new grammar and vocabulary, enhance their reading and writing skills and grow in their understanding of the Roman world, its culture, mythology and history.

Required Preparation

Students must have successfully completed Latin I via KVHS or KET or approval of the KVHS teacher. Call Magistra Jahnige at 1-800-333-9764 for approval.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Ecce Romani Book II, Student Book, Addison Wesley Longman, ISBN# 0- 8013 -1202 –7.  Order No. 79726  
· Pompeiiana Newsletter- subscription to a monthly publication:  6026     Indianola Av. Indianapolis, IN 46220-2014
· Latin/English Dictionary- check your library; suggested edition: The New College Latin & English Dictionary  AMSCO School Publications Inc.  ISBN  #0-87720-561-2. Order No. R617P

Availability

Latin II is a full credit course offered in the Fall and Spring. Latin is available in a traditional yearlong format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester) in Fall or Spring.

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Latin IIA.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Latin IIB.
· To register for a block format, choose Latin IIAB.
· To register for the yearlong format, choose Latin II Full-Year.


Latin III

Instruction for this course is delivered solely via Internet.  Good connectivity is important.  During this course students increase vocabulary and grammar skills and read many authentic Latin writings.

Through these writings as well as stories in the Ecce Romani text, students increase their understanding of the culture, history and mythology of the ancient world.  By listening to poetry and narratives on the Internet, writing from dictation and responding to oral stimuli in Latin.  Students also develop aural/oral skills that are a useful carry over to modern language study.   

During this course students will: 
· Finish the corpus of Latin grammar.
· Acquire proficiency in reading in Latin.
· Become acquainted with Latin authors.
· Learn more about the period of the republic.
· Perfect deductive reasoning skills.
· Develop writing skills in Latin.
· Appreciate rhetorical devices used in Latin and English.
· Have opportunities to create original works in Latin and English.
· Share their knowledge with others.
· Grow in abilities to learn from peers.
· Meet Latin III students in other schools electronically.
· Increase skills in working with the Internet.

Required Preparation

Students must have successfully completed Latin II via KVHS or KET or approval of the KVHS teacher. Call Magistra Jahnige at 1-800-333-9764 for approval.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Ecce Romani Book II, Student Book, Addison Wesley Longman, ISBN# 0-8013-1202-7 Order No. 79726.
· Pompeiiana Newsletter- subscription to a monthly publication:  6026 Indianola Av. Indianapolis, IN 46220-2014
· Latin/English Dictionary - check your library; suggested edition: The New College Latin & English Dictionary, AMSCO School Publications Inc.  ISBN  #0 –87720-561-2.  Order No. R617P

Availability

Latin III is a full credit course offered in the Fall and Spring. Latin is available in a traditional yearlong format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester) in Fall or Spring.

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Latin IIIA.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Latin IIIB.
· To register for a block format, choose Latin IIIAB.
· To register for the yearlong format, choose Latin III Full Year.


Latin Literature/ AP Optional

Latin Literature is designed to allow students to read Latin authors, analyze their writings and discuss them with other students and the teacher. Students read selections from Latin authors, Caesar, Cicero, Augustus, Pliny, Trajan and Eutropius. Grammatical concepts and Latin vocabulary are reinforced in the context of these works. Upon completion of this segment, students read from Catullus and Horace to prepare them for the Advanced Placement Latin Literature exam.

During this course, students:
· Gain introspective into the life of the late Republic and early Empire through selected writings of Roman authors, such as Caesar, Cicero, Augustus, Pliny, Trajan, and Eutropius
· Become familiar with about 1200 lines of poetry of Catullus and Horace
· Write literal translations of sight passages
· Identify and analyze the individual characteristics of different authors such as uses of imagery, figures of speech, metrical effects, onomatopoetic significance
· Scan poetry and appreciate the metrical sound effects.

Required Preparation

Students must have successfully completed Latin III via KVHS or KET or approval of the KVHS teacher. Call Magistra Jahnige at 1-800-333-9764 for approval.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Ecce Romani Book III, Student Book, Addison Wesley Longman, ISBN# 0-8013 -1208- 6. Order No. 79734.
· Pompeiiana Newsletter- subscription to a monthly publication:  6026 Indianola Av. Indianapolis, IN 46220-2014
· Latin/English Dictionary- check your library; suggested edition: The New College Latin & English Dictionary, AMSCO School Publications Inc.  ISBN  #0-87720-561-2.  Order No. R617P.

Availability

Latin Literature is a full credit course offered in the Fall and Spring. Latin is available in a traditional yearlong format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester) in Fall or Spring.

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Latin Literature A.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Latin Literature B.
· To register for a block format, choose Latin Literature AB.
· To register for the yearlong format, choose Latin Literature Full Year.


 

Mathematics

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Program of Studies

High school graduation requirements include three mathematics credits, Algebra I, geometry, and a mathematics elective. The minimum content for Algebra I and geometry is based on Kentucky's academic expectations. Although the Kentucky Board of Education has not specified the elective course, the content of that course should extend beyond middle level mathematics concepts. Together the three courses, Algebra I, geometry and an elective, address Kentucky's Academic Expectations 1.5-1.9, 2.7, 2.8, 2.9, 2.10, 2.11, 2.12, and 2.13.

Schools may configure the mathematics content in multiple ways. For example, schools could require Algebra I and geometry, as specified in the Program of Studies, and a third mathematics course designed by the school. Or, schools could require Integrated Math I, II, and III using all the content from both the Algebra I and geometry charts and additional mathematics such as data analysis. In addition, a local board of education may substitute an integrated, applied, interdisciplinary, or higher level course for a required course if the alternative course provides rigorous content and addresses the same academic expectations.


Algebra I

As students study Algebra, they are introduced to: Linear Equations, Inequalities & Functions; Non-linear functions; Proportional Reasoning, Sequences; and, Probability.  Throughout this course, assignments illustrate how to use Algebra as a tool in everyday life using problems solving, mathematical communications, reasoning and connections.  Students will:
· Define, analyze, write and apply Algebra concepts to real world problems.
· Use and discuss appropriate technology in the study and application of Algebra.
· Illustrate, graph, diagram and compare Algebra concepts and principles.
· Calculate and compute solutions to algebraic problems.
· Determine the best method for solving problems and list or order the steps to take to find solutions.

According to the Program of Studies, districts may offer middle school students the opportunity to earn high school credit.  Middle school students are admitted to this course if the student has demonstrated mastery of the middle level content as specified in the Kentucky Program of Studies .

Recommended Preparation

The student must have mastered middle level content as outlined in the Program of Studies.

Required Textbook

Text currently under review.  To Be Announced.

Availability

Algebra I is a full credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters.  Algebra I is available in a traditional year-long format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester).

· To register for only the first semester of the two semester course, choose Algebra  IA.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Algebra IB.
· To register for the year-long format, choose Algebra I Full-Year.
· To register for a block format, chose Algebra IAB.


Algebra II

Students review Algebra 1 concepts and explore further the concepts of equations, algebraic functions, exponential and trigonometric functions, analytic geometry, discrete mathematic, statistics and probability. Each lesson includes Internet-based Activities that complement the material taught in the lesson.

Students are also encouraged to participate in group research projects and activities throughout the course so that they may collaborate with other students and instructors.

Students will:
· Identify and apply algebra concepts to real themes and activities.
· Use appropriate technology in the study and application of algebra.
· Demonstrate mastery of advanced algebra concepts and principles and discuss the concepts in the virtual classroom.
· Create, diagram and solve problems using algebra concepts.
· Evaluate and integrate learning from the algebra course into other subjects and learning

Recommended Preparation

The student must have successfully completed Algebra I.

Required Textbook

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Advanced Algebra, Bellman, Bragg, Chapin, Gardella and Hall, Prentice Hall, 1998, ISBN 0134190114

Availability

Algebra II is a full credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters.  Algebra II is available in a traditional year-long format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester).

· To register for only the first semester of the two semester course, choose Algebra  IIA.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Algebra IIB.
· To register for the year-long format, choose Algebra II Full-Year.
· To register for a block format, chose Algebra IIAB.


Geometry

Students study the different components of Geometry including: General Relationships; Relationships in Triangles; Quadrilateral Relationships; Other Polygons and Circles; Congruence and Similarities; Measurements; and Coordinate Geometry.  Students will:

· Define key Geometry terms.
· Apply Geometry concepts to real world problems.
· Illustrate Geometry concepts.
· Use appropriate technology in the study and application of Geometry.
· Demonstrate mastery of Geometry concepts and principles.
· Diagram and compare geometrical shapes.
· Construct geometrical figures using Geometry concepts.
· Evaluate proper strategies for solving Geometry problems.
· Discuss Geometry concepts in the virtual classroom.

Recommended Preparation

The student must have mastered Algebra II content.

Textbook

Text currently under review.  To Be Announced.

Availability

Geometry is a full credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters.  Geometry is available in a traditional yearlong format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester).

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Geometry IA.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Geometry IB.
· To register for the yearlong format, choose Geometry Full-Year.
· To register for a block format, chose Geometry IAB.


Precalculus

Pre-Calculus is a one-credit course developing knowledge and understanding of mathematical concepts in preparation for taking Calculus. The course consists of 28 units. There is a unit quiz in each unit, chapter test approximately every 1.5 weeks, midterm exam and final exam. Throughout the course students study various functions and their properties.

The course features cooperative learning and extensive use of web based interactive resources. The course emphasizes applications of the material in the real world. Students review basic algebraic concepts and investigate exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and trigonometric functions. Students investigate vectors, systems of equations, complex numbers, and sequences and series.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have mastered the content for Algebra 1 and Algebra 2, including an overview of Trigonometry.

Required Textbook

All instructional resources for this course are in digital format. No text required.

Availability

Precalculus is a full credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters.  Precalculus is available in a traditional year-long format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester).

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Precalculus A.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Precalculus B.
· To register for the year-long format, choose Precalculus Full-Year.
· To register for a block format, chose Precalculus AB.

Required Textbook
No hard copy texts required. Course materials are available online.


 

Social Studies

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Program of Studies

Three credits in social studies are required for high school graduation. These credits must incorporate the five social studies disciplines of U.S. history, economics, government, world geography, and world civilization. Districts and schools can arrange the essential content within the three-credit requirement
to best meet their needs. A local board of education may substitute an integrated, applied, interdisciplinary, or higher level course for a required course if the alternative course provides rigorous content and addresses the same academic expectations.

The high school social studies program is designed to provide an integrated and comprehensive course of study. Each discipline description contains connections to other areas of the social studies. Because of this design, students will experience the richness and complexity of the social studies.

Living, Learning and Earning: Consumer Economics

Developed by the Kentucky Council on Economic Education with the Kentucky Virtual High School, "Living, Learning, and Earning: Consumer Economics" is an interactive  one-half credit course that will prepare students with the information and decision making skills they need to be successful consumers, business people, entrepreneurs, workers, citizens, and members of the global economy.

This course is built around real life, practical issues, such as career choice and credit cards and the stock markets. Economics concepts are integrated into the materials to aid in understanding real life issues. Students will practice using economic decision making to solve real life problems they will likely face in their future. This course also integrates the vast educational resources of the internet and represents a technology education opportunity for students.

Required Textbooks

No texts required.

Availability

Living, Learning and Earning is a one-half credit course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters.


Vocational Education

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Program of Studies

Vocational Education is an essential component of the high school curriculum. For many students, Vocational Education represents as much as one third of their high school experience. Successful transition to postsecondary education, the workplace, or the military is one of the goals of Kentucky's educational system, and the percentage of students making successful transition is a component of the high school accountability index.
A well-planned sequence of courses, which is focused on a career cluster, impacts students' achievement during high school and student success following high school graduation. When high-quality vocational programs are integrated with high-quality academic programs, students understand the relevance of curriculum in preparation for their futures. Employers are demanding that their future employees have the ability to apply their academic and technical skills to real-world problems that are encountered in the workplace. Occupational data indicate that a significant percentage of jobs will require some level of postsecondary education in a technical field. Vocational Education at the secondary level assists in meeting this demand.


Electronic Office

Whether students plan to become the next Bill Gates, to own their  own dental or vet office, to manage a retail store like Target, or to become an office manager for a lawyer, they will need to know the day-to-day basics of office professionals.

Electronic Office is designed as a capstone course allowing students to complete various simulations to prepare for the transition from school to work. Jobs of the 21st century require technological skills, application of basic skills, and teamwork. Students enrolled in this course will study concepts and learn skills that will help them be successful in post-high school educational fields as well as in the labor market.

By successfully completing this course, students will:
· Apply basic computer skills to various business situations and use advanced technological skills to solve business-related problems
· Understand the professional office environment and its role in a successful business entity
· Display ethical and professional skills related to work habits, attire, etiquette, and netiquette
· Apply information management skills in various business environments
· Develop a fundamental understanding of the economy and how the financial/banking world operates
· Create various employment documents such as resume, work portfolio, and job-related letters
· Display an understanding of time management and its impact on an office professional's daily routine.

Recommended Preparation

Students enrolled in this course should have taken at least one entry-level business course. Students taking this course are expected to have above average keyboarding skills and computer skills that allow them to work independently.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.                                 
· Procedures for the Office Professional, Fourth Edition, South-Western Educational Publishing, by Patsy Fulton-Calkins and Joanna Hanks, ISBN Number 0-538-72212.
· Student workbook that accompanies the text.  ISBN Number 0-538-72213-4

Availability

Electronic Office is a full-credit two-semester course offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer. The course is available in a traditional year-long format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester).

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Electronic Office A.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Electronic Office B.
· To register for the year-long format, choose Electronic Office Full-Year.
· To register for a block format, chose Electronic Office AB.


 

Advanced Placement

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Program of Studies

College Board Advanced Placement (AP) courses provide avenues for motivated college-bound students to access challenging curricula that facilitate high-level attainment of Kentucky's learning goals.  The College Board Advanced Placement Program provides high school students with an opportunity to earn college credit at nearly 3,000 universities and colleges.  The College Board Advanced Placement Program provides transition from secondary school to college through rigorous curricula.
Advanced Placement courses require use of standardized prescribed college level curriculum; textbooks are selected from among standard college texts in the appropriate content area. The College Board provides several sample basic syllabi. Special training for teachers available through College Board AP training institutes is recommended but not required.
The College Board has no restrictions on the age/grade level of students who take Advanced Placement courses and/or Advanced Placement examinations; college credit is solely based on the level of performance on the examination.

The Commonwealth Diploma

In 1987 the Kentucky Board of Education established the Commonwealth Diploma Program to encourage Kentucky's high school students to take demanding and rigorous courses that would prepare them for college.

The Commonwealth Diploma Program is governed by a state regulation, 704 KAR 3:340, which requires that students meet the following criteria to earn a Commonwealth Diploma:
· Complete the state's minimum graduation requirements and/or their local graduation requirements;
· Complete the state's pre-college preparatory curriculum;
· Earn a grade of "C" or better in four Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses in the specific subject areas of:
- English
- Mathematics or Science
- Foreign Language
- Elective; and, C
· Complete Advanced Placement examinations or International Baccalaureate examinations in three of the four subject areas specified above, without regard to score.

Student Qualifications

In general, students registering for Advanced Placement courses should be self-motivated and good independent learners. Good writing skills are important to a student's ability to succeed in an AP course, and essay writing is important to do well on the free-response sections of an AP Exam. Because these courses are computer-based, students should have basic keyboarding skills and be comfortable with getting online, using email, and using a word processor. Specific prerequisites are found in each course description below.
The Kentucky Virtual High School recommends that students registering for Advanced Placement courses schedule at least 15 hours per week of study time (combination of course activities and study).
Students considering registering for KVHS AP courses are encouraged to review the curriculum guidelines posted in the AP Library at The College Board website, www.collegeboard.com.  These course descriptions explain the kinds of skills students are expected to demonstrate in the corresponding college-level course, and describe the AP Exam. They also provide sample multiple-choice questions with an answer key, as well as sample free-response questions.


 

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus AB is a 36-week Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent of an introductory, one-semester, college-level Calculus course. It is designed to comply with College Board recommendations to prepare students for an AP Exam in Calculus AB.

Calculus AB teaches students to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. They learn more than how to calculate right answers. They learn to use and clearly communicate mathematical reasoning, and to translate between the English language and the language of math. Students often will be called upon to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions rather than simply get the right answer. They will focus on developing a deep understanding of mathematical ideas instead of simply memorizing procedures and rules.

Students registered in this course receive AP Calculus AB Online Exam Review as part of their tuition.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have mastered Pre-Calculus.

Required Materials

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.                                 
For Calculus AB, and for the AP Exam, students will need a calculator that can at a minimum:
· Produce the graph of a function within an arbitrary viewing window
· Find the zeros of a function
· Compute the derivative of a function numerically
· Compute definite integrals numerically .

The Texas Instruments TI-83 is referenced specifically in the course, and the instructions for the calculator-based activities use the TI-83's keystrokes. Students who use another type of calculator will be responsible for consulting their Users' Guides and teaching themselves how to do the operations described in the list above.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.                                 
· Single Variable Calculus. 4th ed. James Stewart. Brooks/Cole Publishing, 1999. ISBN: 0534355625.

Availability

AP Calculus AB is a full credit, two-semester course.  The course is not available in block format. Students may begin the first-semester in either the Fall or Spring. Students who begin semester one in Spring will begin semester two the following Fall.


 

AP Chemistry

Chemistry is a 36-week Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent to a general Chemistry course usually taken in the first year of college. It is designed to comply with College Board recommendations to prepare students for an AP Exam in Chemistry. The course helps build students' understanding of the nature and reactivity of matter. The course begins with the structure of atoms, molecules, and ions; then students explore how that structure lets us predict and quantify the chemical reactions that substances undergo.

AP Chemistry will enable you to develop an understanding of chemical concepts and become skilled at solving quantitative chemical problems through a combination of instructional activities. This course will be valuable to all students planning to continue in science, health sciences, or engineering courses in college.

Students registered in this course receive AP Chemistry Online Exam Review as part of their tuition.

Recommended Preparation

Suggested pre-requisites are Introduction to Chemistry and Algebra II.

Required Materials

Labs: Students will learn experimental lab methodology through a variety of computer-based learning activities. These activities are designed to incorporate the learning goals of the laboratory activities recommended by The College Board. Successful completion of these activities will prepare a student to answer the laboratory questions on the AP Science Exams. Because wet laboratory experience is an important component of college science courses, The College Board recommends that AP science courses include wet laboratory activities. This course includes an optional wet laboratory component that schools or teachers can provide for their students. Wet labs require school supervision. Please inquire.

Required Textbooks

No specific text required although students will need access to an advanced chemistry text. The instructor will guide student selection among texts available in their school or public libraries.

Availability

AP Chemistry is a full credit, two-semester course.  The course is not available in block format. Students may begin the first-semester in either the Fall or Spring. Students who begin semester one in Spring will begin semester two the following Fall.


 

AP Physics

AP Physics is a one-year high school course for students with career plans in science, math, engineering, medicine, and similar fields. Using college textbooks, syllabi, homework, and tests, this course provides students with a rigorous preparation for the AP Physics B test and the Medical College Aptitude Test.
The course provides full instruction on all topics on a set of 32 CD-ROMs. Nearly every phenomenon studied is illustrated by animation and/or video. In all cases, the student has complete control of the flow of the instruction. The student can take a second look at a difficult passage in the lecture and fast-forward past another. All the tools used in the lessons are available for use during review or while doing homework. Lectures and demonstrations are integrated with lessons in problem solving.

Students work independently, with minimal need for supervision at their school. The teacher is available via e-mail and phone when help is needed. Tests are graded by the teacher. Homework is graded by computer. Students may re-try missed homework until they are successful.

The course has no lab component. It is recommended, but not required, that students take this course as a follow-up to a general high school physics course with a lab component. It should be stressed that this course will follow the College Board's guidelines for AP Physics. As such, it is equivalent to a yearlong sophomore-level college course. This course is for highly motivated students who are ready for a challenge.

Students registered in this course receive AP Chemistry Online Exam Review as part of their tuition.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have mastered the concepts of Algebra II, Geometry, Trigonometry, and Physics. With regard to Physics preparation, It is recommended but not required that students take this course as a follow-up to a general high school physics
course with a lab component.

Required Materials

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.                                 
· Physics 5th Edition, Peoples Publishing, ISBN #0-471-32146X.

Availability

AP Physics is a full credit, two-semester course.  The course is not available in block format. Students may begin the first-semester in either the Fall or Spring. Students who begin semester one in Spring will begin semester two the following Fall.

Early Start Option:  With permission of the instructor, students may start the course as early as June 16 prior to the Fall semester. For more information on this early-start option, email the teacher at the email Chuck Duncan at cduncan@ket.org.


AP Biology

AP Biology is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year.  It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. The two main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and to help students gain an appreciation of science as a process. The ongoing information explosion in biology makes these goals even more challenging. Primary emphasis in an Advanced Placement Biology course should be on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on memorizing terms and technical details. Essential to this conceptual understanding are the following: a grasp of science as a process rather than as an accumulation of facts; personal experience in scientific inquiry; recognition of unifying themes that integrate the major topics of biology; and application of biological knowledge and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns.

AP Biology is representative of the topics covered by the AP exam. Accordingly, goals have been set for percentage coverage of three general areas:
· Molecules and Cells, 25%
· Heredity and Evolution, 25%
· Organisms and Populations, 50%

Recommended Preparation

Students should have successfully completed high school biology and high school chemistry.

Required Materials

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these:

  • Biology: Concepts and Connections book , ISBN: 0-8053-6585-0, Addison Wesley
  • AP Biology Laboratory Manual for Students, Exercises 1-12 Edition D 1997 book, The College Board, IN# 209121

Lab Equipment
A set of generic lab materials is required. Potential providers have been identified (Science Kit & Boreal laboratories - sciencekit.com or Carolina Scientific - www.carolina.com) for convenience. However, schools may find these materials in house or from another source.
• Dialysis Tubing 1 ¾ inch X 50 feet, Student receives 12 in.
• Dual Calibration Spring Scale 250g/2.5N, Student receives 1
• Plastic tubing Tygon Bore 1/8 wall 1/16, Student receives 16 in.
• Glucose tablets - any local drugstore, Student receives 3
• Diastix strips - any local drugstore, Student receives 3
• Glass Pipet 0.1 mL in 0.01 divisions, Student receives 1
• Filter Paper 33 mm, Student receives 1
• Graduated Cylinder 50 mL, Student receives 1
• Plastic Pipet 3.0 mL microchemistry, Student receives 1
An online subscription to “The Biology Place” and “Virtual Labs” is included in the course fee.

Availability

AP Biology is a full credit, two-semester course.  The course is not available in block format. Students may begin the first-semester in either the fall or spring. Students who begin semester one in spring will begin semester two the following fall.


AP English Language and Composition

English Language and Composition is a 36-week Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent of a one-semester, college-level, English Language and Composition survey course. It is designed to comply with College Board recommendations to prepare students for an AP Exam in English Language and Composition.

AP English Language and Composition helps students become critical readers and flexible, skilled writers. Through a varied curriculum-from classical literature to popular prose-students learn the process of writing and how to tailor it to communicate effectively in academic, personal, and professional contexts.

Students learn to understand and analyze complex styles of writing by reading the works of a variety of authors, including other students. The richness of language is explored through study of syntax, imitation, word choice, and tone. Students learn about their own composition style and process, focusing on exploration, planning, writing, editing, rewriting, and polishing of text.

Mastery of the English language is key to a student's success in high school, college, and professional settings. This course will be valuable to all students looking to become skillful readers and effective written communicators.

Students registered in this course receive AP English Lanaguge and Composition Online Exam Review as part of their tuition.

Recommended Preparation

The suggested pre-requisite is t least a B in your most recent English course.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.  

  • APCD English Language CD College Board Publications 1-800-323-7155 http://collegeboard.com

Availability

AP English Language and Composition is a full credit, two-semester course.  The course is not available in block format. Students may begin the first-semester in either the Fall or Spring. Students who begin semester one in Spring will begin semester two the following Fall.

 


 

AP English Literature and Composition

English Literature and Composition is a 36-week Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent of a one-semester, college-level, English Literature and Composition survey course. It is designed to comply with College Board recommendations to prepare students for an AP Exam in English Literature and Composition.

In addition to preparing students for the AP Exam, this course prepares students for university courses in literature, composition, and creative writing. A variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and discussions with peers and instructors help students assess and improve their skills and knowledge. Special emphasis is placed on reading comprehension, structural and critical analysis of written works, and the recognition and understanding of literary devices. Students also gain insight through exposure to historical and cultural information about the authors and works they read. This course will be valuable to all students looking to become skillful readers and effective written communicators.

Students registered in this course receive AP English Literature and Composition Online Exam Review as part of their tuition.

Recommended Preparation

The suggested pre-requisite-at least a B in your most recent English course.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these. These materials may be available on loan from a local library or video store. For the videos, especially, we recommend borrowing rather than buying if possible.

Hamlet video     
 Poor Yorrick
 89a Downie Street
 Stratford, Ontario, Canada  N5A 1W8
 

The Importance of Being Ernest video,  ISBN0790768275
 

Cliff notes – AP Literature and Composition
Preparation Guide,  ISBN#0-8220-2305-9
 

Sound and Sense-An Introduction to Poetry  
 ISBN#0-15-507396-6
 

APCD- Advanced Placement Literature CD  
 College Board Publications
 1-800-323-7155
 http://collegeboard.com

Grapes of Wrath CD  (for use by up to two students)   
 Orange Cherry New Media
 PO Box 390
 Pound Ridge, NY 10576
 1-800-672-6002                                 

Availability

AP English Literature and Composition is a full credit, two-semester course.  The course is not available in block format. Students may begin the first-semester in either the Fall or Spring. Students who begin semester one in Spring will begin semester two the following Fall.

 


AP Psychology

AP Psychology provides an overview of current psychological research methods and theories. Students will explore the therapies used by professional counselors and clinical psychologists and examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. They will study core psychological concepts, such as the brain and sense functions, and learn to gauge human reactions, gather information, and form meaningful syntheses. Along the way, students will also investigate relevant concepts like study skills and information retention. The equivalent of a 100-level college survey course, AP Psychology prepares students for the AP Exam and for further studies in psychology and life sciences.

Note: Based on the AP Psychology topic outline from the College Board, this course addresses the topic of human sexuality. The topic accounts for less than 5% of the course and focuses on the subject of gender development and identity.


Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these:

  • Essentials of Psychology, Dennis Coon, ISBN: 0534597874, 9th Edition


Availability

AP Psychology is a one semester course, available in the Fall and Spring.


AP Statistics

Statistics is a 36-week Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent of a non-calculus-based introductory college course. It is designed to comply with College Board recommendations to prepare students for an AP Exam in Statistics.

AP Statistics gives students hands-on experience collecting, analyzing, graphing, and interpreting real-world data. Through online discussions and assignments, students will develop skills in effectively designing and analyzing research.

Students registered in this course receive AP Statistics Online Exam Review as part of their tuition.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have mastered the concepts of Algebra II.

Required Materials

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.                                 
· Introduction to Probability &Statistics.; 10th ed. William Mendenhall, Robert J. Beaver, and Barbara M. Beaver. Brooks/Cole Thompson Learning Incorporated. 1999. ISBN: 0534357784. (A complete digital version of this text is contained in the course. Students may prefer a bound copy.)  For AP Statistics, and for the AP Exam, students will need a Texas Instruments TI-83 graphing calculator.

Availability

AP Statistics is a full credit, two-semester course.  The course is not available in block format. Students may begin the first-semester in either the Fall or Spring. Students who begin semester one in Spring will begin semester two the following Fall.

 


 

AP United States History

U.S. History is a 36-week Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent of a one-semester, college-level, U.S. History survey course. It is designed to comply with College Board recommendations to prepare students for an AP Exam in U.S. History.

Through analysis and exploration, students in AP U.S. History build an understanding of the economic, political, and social changes that have occurred in America since Columbus. Students learn how decisions and events of the past continue to have profound effects on the world today and how knowledge of the causes behind past events can influence future decisions. Students put their factual knowledge to work by weighing evidence and interpreting problems presented by historians. Mastery of historical knowledge and skill in critical analysis are the cornerstones of this course. Through a variety of individual and collaborative activities, students focus on building reading, writing, and communication skills they'll use throughout their academic and professional careers.

Students registered in this course receive AP U.S. History Online Exam Review as part of their tuition.

Recommended Preparation

Suggested pre-requisites are at least a B in your most recent social studies course and good writing skills.

Required Materials

  • APCD United States History CD College Board Publications 1-800-323-7155 http://collegeboard.com
  • America: A Brief Fifth Edition ISBN#0-393-97442-1 (paperback)

Students will also need access to Inspiration Software:

  • Inspiration CD Inspiration Software, Inc. 7412 Beaverton Hillsdale #102 Portland, OR 97225-2162 503-297-4676

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.                                 

Availability

AP U.S. History is a full credit, two-semester course.  The course is not available in block format. Students may begin the first-semester in either the Fall or Spring. Students who begin semester one in Spring will begin semester two the following Fall.

 


 

AP Microeconomics

Microeconomics is an 18-week Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent of an introductory, one-semester, college-level Microeconomics course. It is designed to comply with College Board recommendations for preparing students for an AP Exam in Microeconomics.
AP Microeconomics teaches students how economists look for patterns in economic behavior and how they use these patterns to explain and help predict how buyers and sellers behave under different economic conditions. Topics covered in the course include the economic way of thinking, on understanding the nature and function of markets, on the role of scarcity and competition, on the influence of factors such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in promoting a healthy economy.
Students registered in this course receive AP Microeconomics Online Exam Review as part of their tuition.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have mastered the concepts of Algebra I.

Required Materials

There is no required textbook for this course.

Availability

AP Microeconomics is a one-semester course.   It is offered in the Fall and the Spring.

 


 

AP Macroeconomics

Macroeconomics is an 18-week Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent of an introductory, one-semester, college-level Macroeconomics course.  It is designed to comply with The College Board recommendations for preparing students for an AP Exam in Macroeconomics.

Macroeconomics explains how to identify trends in our economy and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of how our economy will grow or decline. Examine how individuals, institutions, and influences affect your own economic status, and how these factors can change your life through employment rates, inflation, government spending, taxes, and production. The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP Macroeconomics prepares students for the AP Exam and for further study in business, history, and political science.

Students registered in this course receive AP Macroeconomics Online Exam Review as part of their tuition.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have mastered the concepts of Algebra II.

Required Materials

There is no required textbook for this course.

Availability

AP Macroeconomics is a one-semester course.   It is offered in the Fall and the Spring.

 


 

AP United States Government and Politics

U.S. Government and Politics is an 18-week Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent to an introductory, one-semester, college-level U.S. Government course. It is designed to comply with College Board recommendations for preparing students for an AP Exam in U.S. Government and Politics.

U.S. Government and Politics course covers the "nuts and bolts" of the American political system, and shows students how to gather and analyze data about political behavior and form theories about how and why our political system acts as it does. It's not a course about what is the best political policy, but about the structure and operations of the U.S. government and the behavior of the electorate and politicians.

This course will be valuable to students interested in politics, considering a major in a social science field, or contemplating a career in law, politics, or education. Students will gain an analytic perspective, enabling them to critically evaluate political information, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes. Through online discussions and essay assignments, students will develop the skills they need to examine general propositions about government and politics and to analyze the specific relationships between political, social, and economic institutions.

Students registered in this course receive AP U.S. Government and Politics Online Exam Review as part of their tuition.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have mastered the concepts of U.S. History and have good writing skills.

Required Materials

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.

  • Government by the People, book w/CD, ISBN #0-13-0743178

Availability

AP U.S. Government and Politics is a one-semester course.   It is offered in the Fall and the Spring.

 


 

Latin Literature/ AP Optional

Latin Literature is designed to allow students to read Latin authors, analyze their writings and discuss them with other students and the teacher. Students read selections from Latin authors, Caesar, Cicero, Augustus, Pliny, Trajan and Eutropius. Grammatical concepts and Latin vocabulary are reinforced in the context of these works. Upon completion of this segment, students read from Catullus and Horace to prepare them for the Advanced Placement Latin Literature exam.

During this course, students:
· Gain introspective into the life of the late Republic and early Empire through selected writings of Roman authors, such as Caesar, Cicero, Augustus, Pliny, Trajan, and Eutropius
· Become familiar with about 1200 lines of poetry of Catullus and Horace
· Write literal translations of sight passages
· Identify and analyze the individual characteristics of different authors such as uses of imagery, figures of speech, metrical effects, onomatopoetic significance
· Scan poetry and appreciate the metrical sound effects.

Required Preparation

Students must have successfully completed Latin III via KVHS or KET or approval of the KVHS teacher. Call Magistra Jahnige at 1-800-333-9764 for approval.

Required Textbooks

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.
· Ecce Romani Book III, Student Book, Addison Wesley Longman, ISBN# 0-8013 -1208-6. Order No. 79734.
· Pompeiiana Newsletter- subscription to a monthly publication:  6026 Indianola Av. Indianapolis, IN 46220-2014
· Latin/English Dictionary- check your library; suggested edition: The New College Latin & English Dictionary, AMSCO School Publications Inc.  ISBN  #087720-561-2. Order No. R617P.

Availability

Latin Literature is a full credit course offered in the Fall and Spring. Latin is available in a traditional yearlong format or in a block (the entire credit earned in one semester) in Fall or Spring.

· To register for only the first semester of the two-semester course, choose Latin Literature A.
· To register for only the second semester, choose Latin Literature B.
· To register for a block format, choose Latin Literature AB.
· To register for the yearlong format, choose Latin Literature Full Year.


 

AP Spanish Language

The AP Spanish Language course is designed around the College Board curriculum for the AP exam. The course focuses on listening, speaking, reading, and writing at a proficient level in Spanish.

The learning objectives for this course are:
· The ability to comprehend formal and informal spoken Spanish; 
· The acquisition of vocabulary and a grasp of structure to allow the easy, accurate reading of newspaper and magazine articles, as well as of modern literature in Spanish;
· The ability to compose expository passages; and
· The ability to express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency.

(AP Online Exam Review is not currently available for this course.)

Availability

AP Spanish Language is a full credit, two-semester course.  The course is not available in block format. Students may begin the first-semester in either the Fall or Spring. Students who begin semester one in Spring will begin semester two the following Fall.

Recommended Preparation

Students should have knowledge of the Spanish language and familiarity with Spanish speaking cultures. Additionally, students must be able to speak, read, write, and comprehend auditory Spanish passages.

It is recommended students complete a minimum of 3 Spanish credits before enrolling in this course.

Required Materials

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.

From Wayside Publishing ( www.waysidepublishing.com or email wayside@sprintmail.com), 129 Commonwealth Avenue, Concord, MA 01742, Telephone 888.302.2519
· Triangulo:Aplicaciones Practicas de la Lengua Espanola, 3rd Edition, Student text (ISBN 1-877653-74-8)
· Cassettes  to accompany text (set of 3) (ISBN 1-877653-76-4)
From Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley, 4350 Equity Drive, PO Box 2649, Columbus, OH 43216, Tel. 800-552-2259
· AP Spanish: Preparing for the Language Examination, Student text (ISBN 0-8013-1531-X)
· Audio Cassettes to accompany text (ISBN 0-8013-1533-6)
· Una Vez Mas, Student Text (ISBN 0-8013-0971-9) and Student Test Book (ISBN 0-8013-0973-5)


AP French Language

The AP French Language course is designed around the College Board curriculum for the AP exam. The course focuses on listening, speaking, reading, and writing at a proficient level in French.

The learning objectives for this course are:
· The ability to understand spoken French in various contexts;
· A French vocabulary sufficiently ample for reading newspaper and magazine articles, literary texts, and other non-technical writings without dependence on a dictionary; and
· The ability to express oneself coherently, resourcefully, and with reasonable fluency and accuracy in both written and spoken French.

(AP Online Exam Review is not currently available for this course.)

Recommended Preparation

Students should have knowledge of the French language and familiarity with French cultures. Additionally, students must be able to speak, read, write, and comprehend auditory French passages.

It is recommended students complete a minimum of 3 French credits before enrolling in this course.

Required Materials

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.

From Wayside Publishing ( www.waysidepublishing.com or email wayside@sprintmail.com ), 129 Commonwealth Avenue, Concord, MA 01742, Telephone 888.302.2519:

  • Triangle:Applications Pratiques de la Langue Francaise, Student text, Wayside Publishing; ISBN: 1877653543; 3 edition (January 1, 2021) and
  • Cassettes to accompany text (set of 2)  ISBN: 1877653624; (March 1998)  

From Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley, 4350 Equity Drive, PO Box 2649, Columbus, OH 43216, Tel. 800-552-2259. From time to time, the following  texts can be bought together from Amazon at a reduced price. You will notice this information when you retrieve the info for either of the texts:

  • Une Fois Pour Toutes, Student Text Prentice Hall (K-12); ISBN: 0801308259; 2 edition (December 1993)
  • AP French Preparing for the Language Examination, (ISBN 0-673-21847-3) Prentice Hall (K-12);  2nd edition (November 2000)  

Availability

AP French Language is a full credit, two-semester course.  The course is not available in block format. Students may begin the first-semester in either the Fall or Spring. Students who begin semester one in Spring will begin semester two the following Fall.


AP German  Language

The AP German Language course is designed around the College Board curriculum for the AP exam. The course focuses on active communication including listening, speaking, reading, and writing at a proficient level in German.

The learning objectives for this course are:
· Develop a strong command of vocabulary and structure;
· Understand spoken German in various conversational situations;
· Read newspaper and magazine articles, contemporary fiction, and non-technical writings without the use of a dictionary; and
· Fluently and accurate expressions of ideas orally and in writing.

(AP Online Exam Review is not currently available for this course.)

Recommended Preparation

Students should have knowledge of the German language and familiarity with German speaking cultures. Additionally, students must be able to speak, read, write, and comprehend auditory German passages.

It is recommended students complete a minimum of 3 German credits before enrolling in this course.

Required Materials

The cost of the required course materials is not included in the course fee. The local school is responsible for providing these.

From McDougal Littell
· Kaleidiskop, 5th edition Order # 3-37880, Koeller, Liedloff, Adolph, and Mabee
· Cassette program Order # 3-37886

Availability

AP German Language  is a full credit, two semester course.  The course is not available in block format. Students may begin the first-semester in either the Fall or Spring. Students who begin semester one in Spring will begin semester two the following Fall.


 


 

Professional Development

Back to T.O.C.

KVHS Summer INTENSIVE PD Sessions

for teachers will start June 17

The Kentucky Virtual High School (KVHS) Summer 2002 professional development and school improvement courses for teachers will begin June 17. These fee-based, online courses are accessible to teachers anywhere, anytime, any place via Internet-connected computer.

Ten courses are available:

  • Using Microsoft PowerPoint Across the Curriculum

  • Engaging Students in Reading With the World Wide Web

  • The Science Classroom and Technology Integration

  • The Elementary Math Classroom and Technology Integration

  • The One Computer Classroom and Technology Integration

  • Introduction to Online Teaching and Learning

  • Using the Online Stock Market Game in Your Classroom

  • Using Internet Resources to Integrate Economics K-5

  • Principal Selection Training for SBDM Council Members

  • Introduction to Consolidated Planning

Two Short Intensive Sessions are available:

Session #1

Registration Opens April 8 Registration Closes June 20, 5 p.m.
Courses Open June 17 Courses Close July 12

Session #2

Registration Opens April 8 Registration Closes July 25, 5 p.m.
Courses Open July 22 Courses Close August 12

Course descriptions and web-based registration, plus information about cost, professional development credit, intended audience and grade level, will be available online starting April 8, on the KVHS web page at www.kvhs.org.

For more information, contact Bob Fortney, at bfortney@kde.state.ky.us or toll free at (866) 432-0008.


Using Internet Resources to Integrate Basic Economic Concepts K-5

Contact Hours: 1 to 12 PD hours. Note: Individual school policy dictates if these PD hours will be accepted at the local level.

Cost: $70

Minimum Enrollment: 10     Maximum Enrollment: 30

Instructor: Susan Sandage, M.Ed., Kentucky Council on Economic Education

Instructor Bio: Susan Sandage earned a Masters in Education with a focus on Instructional Technology from the University of Louisville in 2001, and is the Instructional Technology Director for the Kentucky Council on Economic Education.  Susan developed this course.  She has also coordinated the Stock Market Game program in Kentucky for the past 8 years.

Description: In this course, offered by the Kentucky Council on Economic Education, educators will be introduced to K-5 lessons and simulations on the Internet that will help them teach basic economic concepts, like opportunity cost, scarcity, choice, producer, consumer, money, specialization, goods, services, resources, and interdependence.  Educators will learn how they can meet K-5 Standards using economics resources and how to structure their own lessons to meet standards across the curriculum that focus on economics, personal finance and consumerism.  The online threaded discussion feature will provide the opportunity to share knowledge and teaching strategies with colleagues.

Intended Audience:  Educators, grades K-5, wanting to integrate basic economics and technology into their classroom subjects, i.e., social studies, math, practical living, language arts, etc., as they meet Kentucky Standards.

Hardware & Software Required: Participants will need regular access to a computer that meets the KVHS minimum hardware requirements http://www.kvhs.org/index.real?action=Technical, a connection to the Internet, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher

Prerequisite Skills Needed: Familiarity with the computer and ability to use email and the Internet.

Instructional Goal:  Educators will become familiar with KCEE curricula and web resources that will help them teach basic economic concepts and will relate these lessons to Kentucky Learning Goals and Standards. They will also have the chance to develop their own online lessons.

Intended Outcomes: Educators will develop their own library of resources to teach the basic economic concepts and relate their teaching to Kentucky Standards as they engage students in learning important life skills and knowledge.

Need Additional Information? Contact Bob Fortney with the KVHS at bfortney@kde.state.ky.us or course instructor, Susan Sandage with the Kentucky Council on Economic Education at  info@econky.win.net.


Integrating Economics Using the Internet Stock Market Game (SMG)

Contact Hours: 1 to 12 PD hours. Note: Individual school policy dictates if these PD hours will be accepted at the local level.

Cost: $70

Minimum Enrollment: 10    Maximum Enrollment: 30

Instructor: Susan Sandage, SMG Director, Kentucky Council on Economic Education

Instructor Bio: Susan Sandage is the Stock Market Game Director for the Kentucky Council on Economic Education.  Susan developed this course.

Description: In this course, offered by the Kentucky Council on Economic Education,  the online virtual instructor will introduce educators to the Internet SMG Worldwide Stock Market Game and to lesson plans that will help them meet their teaching objectives as they integrate the simulation into math, social studies, language arts, practical living, business, entrepreneurship, or technology.  Educators will be guided in a demonstration of the Stock Market Game website, including how to "register online",  "make a trade", "read portfolio pages", "online research" and access and use lessons in the "Learning Resource Center".  They will also be introduced to the basics of economics, markets, and investing, and how they can meet academic expectations in the core content for economics and math while meeting technology standards Using the online threaded discussion feature, educators will have the opportunity to learn how to use SMG in the classroom, share their knowledge and teaching strategies with colleagues, and ask questions as they begin using the simulation in the classroom with their students.

Educators will have access to the Internet Stock Market Game simulation during the course. The Stock Market Game program is offered to students in the fall and spring each year.  For more information about the SMG Worldwide Stock Market Game, go to www.econ.org.

Intended Audience:  Educators, grades 5-12 wanting to integrate economics into their classroom subjects, i.e., social studies, math, practical living, language arts, business, entrepreneurship, technology, etc. through the Internet Stock Market Game.

Hardware & Software Required: Participants will need regular access to a computer that meets the KVHS minimum hardware requirements http://www.kvhs.org/index.real?action=Technical, a connection to the Internet, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher

Prerequisite Skills Needed: Familiarity with the computer and ability to use email and the Internet.

Instructional Goal:  Educators will become familiar with the Internet Stock Market Game and be introduced to lessons to teach basic economics, markets, and investing that meet economics, math, and technology standards.

Intended Outcomes: Educators will become comfortable in teaching the basic concepts of economics, markets and investing, as they use the Internet Stock Market Game simulation to engage students in learning important life skills and knowledge.

Need Additional Information? Contact Bob Fortney with the KVHS at bfortney@kde.state.ky.us or course instructor, Susan Sandage with the Kentucky Council on Economic Education at info@econky.win.net.


Using Microsoft PowerPoint across the Curriculum  

Contact Hours: 1 to 12 PD hours. Note: Individual school policy dictates if these PD hours will be accepted at the local level.

Cost: $70  

Minimum Enrollment: 10    Maximum Enrollment: 30

Instructor: Cathy Brandt

Instructor Bio: Cathy Brandt is a District Technology Resource Teacher in the Fayette County Public Schools.  A teacher in elementary school for 11 years and as a technology resource teacher she has experience with integrating technology throughout all areas of the curriculum.

Description: Using Microsoft PowerPoint across the Curriculum is designed to introduce basic and advanced features of the program while integrating it across all content areas It will provide teachers an opportunity to learn PowerPoint for the first time or to extend their current level of knowledge.  Learners will review and evaluate PowerPoint resources, activities, and templates used by teachers and students.  Learners will have the opportunity to choose which modules best meet their learning style and needs.  Modules available include basic and advanced components of PowerPoint as well as uses in each area of Core Content.

Intended Audience: Anyone wanting to learn how to use PowerPoint. The course is designed for the novice as well as veteran user of PowerPoint. There will be a basic introduction as well as exposure to advanced and fun features. Students will have the opportunity to complete this course as an independent study or with a teacher guide.

Hardware & Software Required: Participants will need regular access to a computer that meets the KVHS minimum hardware requirements http://www.kvhs.org/index.real?action=Technical, a connection to the Internet, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher and Microsoft PowerPoint.

Prerequisite Skills Needed: Familiarity with the computer and ability to use email and the Internet.

Instructional Goal: Participants will gain an understanding of how to utilize Power Point to create meaningful presentations.

Intended Outcomes:

  • Participants will review and evaluate existing PowerPoint presentations for use in their classroom
  • Participants will create a presentation to communicate meaningful information to an authentic audience.
  • Participants will explore ways to incorporate PowerPoint into each area of the curriculum.

Need Additional Information: Contact Bob Fortney with the KVHS at bfortney@kde.state.ky.us or course instructor, Cathy Brandt at cbrandt@fayette.k12.ky.us


Engaging Students in Reading with the World Wide Web

Contact Hours: 1 to 12 PD hours. Note: Individual school policy dictates if these PD hours will be accepted at the local level.

Cost: $70 

Minimum Enrollment: 10    Maximum Enrollment: 30

Instructor: Cathy Brandt

Instructor Bio: Cathy Brandt is a District Technology Resource Teacher in the Fayette County Public Schools.  A teacher in elementary school for 11 years and as a technology resource teacher she has experience with integrating technology throughout all areas of the curriculum. Cathy designed and developed this course.

Jenni Keith is a Technology Integration Specialist for Fayette County Public Schools in Lexington, Kentucky. She spent ten years working in Washington State post-secondary institutions utilizing technology in support of teaching, research, student recruitment, and gifting. She holds a masters degree in Educational Technology and has been working with technology in K-12 public schools for the last ten years. Jenni taught this course in its pilot phase.

Description: Engaging Students in Reading Via the World Wide Web will guide teacher through discovering existing resources on the World Wide Web to engage students in meaningful reading activities.  Teachers will gain professional and student resources develop online activities for students and are exposed to a variety of reading materials on the web.  As a result of participation in this course teachers will find a variety of ways to engage students in reading and enhance literacy instruction in the classroom. Teachers will create and discuss innovative literacy activities to use in all areas of the curriculum.

Intended Audience: Teachers

Hardware & Software Required: Participants will need regular access to a computer that meets the KVHS minimum hardware requirements http://www.kvhs.org/index.real?action=Technical, a connection to the Internet, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher

Prerequisite Skills Needed: Familiarity with the computer and ability to use email and the Internet.

Instructional Goal: As a result of participation in this course teachers will acquire resources and develop strategies to use within their literacy instruction to engage students in reading using the World Wide Web.

Intended Outcomes:

  • Teachers will acquire web-based resources to enhance their literacy instruction.

  • Teachers will develop student activities using the web.

  • Teachers will explore various strategies for engaging students in a variety of reading on the web.

Need Additional Information? Contact Bob Fortney with the KVHS at bfortney@kde.state.ky.us or course instructor, Cathy Brandt, at cbrandt@fayette.k12.ky.us


Using Technology to Enhance the Elementary Math Curriculum

Contact Hours: 1 to 12 PD hours. Note: Individual school policy dictates if these PD hours will be accepted at the local level.

Cost: $70 

Minimum Enrollment: 10    Maximum Enrollment: 30

Instructor: Jenni Keith

Instructor Bio: Jenni Keith is a Technology Integration Specialist for Fayette County Public Schools in Lexington, Kentucky. She spent ten years working in Washington State post-secondary institutions utilizing technology in support of teaching, research, student recruitment, and gifting. She holds a masters degree in Educational Technology and has been working with technology in K-12 public schools for the last ten years. Jenni designed and developed this course.

Description: This course is designed to assist teachers in integrating various tools of technology into their math curriculum.  Teachers will locate and evaluate extensive Internet resources, as well as other technology tools. In addition, teachers will create unique projects to enhance student mathematical thinking and learning.

Intended Audience: Elementary teachers

Hardware & Software Required: Regular access to a computer that meets the KVHS minimum hardware requirements http://www.kvhs.org/index.real?action=Technical, a connection to the Internet, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher plus access to a suite of software including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation/slide show programs.

Prerequisite Skills Needed: Familiarity with the computer and the ability to comfortably navigate the Internet, use email, and word processing software.

Instructional Goal: Teachers will learn ways to integrate various technology tools into their math curriculum as evidenced by a technology rich project implemented with their students.

Intended Outcomes: Teachers will become familiar with Internet and other resources available to enrich their math curriculum. An original technology-rich lesson plan will be written and implemented with their students.

Need Additional Information? Contact Bob Fortney with the KVHS at bfortney@kde.state.ky.us or course instructor, Jenni Keith, at  jkeith@kde.state.ky.us  


The Science Classroom and Technology Integration

Contact Hours: 1 to 12 PD hours. Note: Individual school policy dictates if these PD hours will be accepted at the local level.

Cost: $70

Minimum Enrollment:  10   Maximum Enrollment: 30

Instructor: Mike Johnson

Instructor Bio:  An Owenton, Kentucky native, Mike Johnson is in his 7th year as a teacher in Fayette County. He taught science for 4 years in Madisonville, KY and one year at Bryan Station Middle in Lexington. He is an Eastern Kentucky University alumnus, where he also completed his Masters of Science. An extensive knowledge of website construction and FrontPage makes him an invaluable member of the team producing and maintaining the TALK (Technology Assisting Literary Knowledge) website, as well as the Literary Book Club (both are featured in this issue of TIPS). Last year, Mike initiated TechExpo, which provides web projects and contests aligned with the core curriculum, for students through STLP and classroom settings. Visit his district website at http://www.fayette.k12.ky.us/instructtech/trt20/. Mike designed and developed this course.

Description: This course will lead you through an exploration of a variety of web resources that will enhance your science curriculum.  As you complete this course you will develop a personal library of web sites to use with your students.  We will look at resources for life, earth, and physical science topics.  The class discussions will focus on ways of using the sites to teach Kentucky’s Core Content.

Intended Audience: 4th – 12th grade teachers

Hardware & Software Required: Participants will need regular access to a computer that meets the KVHS minimum hardware requirements http://www.kvhs.org/index.real?action=Technical, a connection to the Internet, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher

Prerequisite Skills Needed: Familiarity with the computer and ability to use email and the Internet.

Instructional Goal: Teachers will have a better understanding of ways their science curriculum can be enhanced with Internet resources.

Intended Outcomes: Teachers will develop a personal library of web-based resources to use in their science classrooms.  They will locate and evaluate Internet resources, and plan ways to integrate these resources into their curriculum.

Need Additional Information? Contact Bob Fortney with the KVHS at bfortney@kde.state.ky.us or course instructor, Mike Johnson at mdjohnson@fayette.k12.ky.us


The One Computer Classroom and Technology Integration

Contact Hours: 1 to 12 PD hours. Note: Individual school policy dictates if these PD hours will be accepted at the local level.

Cost: $70

Minimum Enrollment: 10   Maximum Enrollment: 30

Instructor: Barbara Barr

Instructor Bio: Barbara Barr is a Technology Resource Teacher in Fayette County Public Schools, and has been in education for 26 years.  In her 15 years of classroom experience, Barbara was selected as the Teacher of the Year (Plano, Texas) and has won the H. Ross Perot Award for Excellence in Teaching.  Barbara has also spent 11 years in adult education, of which the last four have been in technology.  The majority of the activities in the “Joy of Teaching in the One, Two, Too Few Computer Classroom” were actually used in her own one computer classroom. Barbara designed and developed this course.

Description: This course features classroom tested tips, tricks, techniques, activities, and strategies for effective technology use in the one, two, or too few computer classroom.  From classroom management and planning to activities and implementation strategies, this course will cover a wide range of information to enrich the learning environment.  Effective implementation of technology into the classroom generally raises student achievement and attendance.  This course will help teachers of all backgrounds reach these objectives.  Both new and experienced technology users will find invaluable resources in this course.

Intended Audience: Pre-K - 12 teachers

Hardware & Software Required: Participants will need regular access to a computer that meets the KVHS minimum hardware requirements http://www.kvhs.org/index.real?action=Technical, a connection to the Internet, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher.

Prerequisite Skills Needed: Familiarity with the computer and ability to use email and the Internet.

Instructional Goal: Participants will have abundant resources and ideas to more fully utilize technology as a tool to augment all aspects of the learning environment.

Intended Outcomes: Increased usage of technology as a tool to enrich all aspects of the learning environment, and to improved student achievement & attendance.

Need Additional Information? Contact Bob Fortney with the KVHS at bfortney@kde.state.ky.us or course instructor, Barbara Barr, at  bbarr@fayette.k12.ky.us  


Introduction to Online Teaching and Learning

Contact Hours: 1 to 12 PD hours. Note: Individual school policy dictates if these PD hours will be accepted at the local level.

Contact Hours:

Cost: $70

Minimum Enrollment: 10    Maximum Enrollment: 30

Instructor: Bob Fortney

Instructor Bio: Bob Fortney is one of the original four members of the Kentucky Virtual High School team. He joined the KVHS project in December 1999.

Previously Bob served for five years as the Region 5 KETS Coordinator for the Office of Education Technology in the Kentucky Department of Education.

Before joining the Kentucky Department of Education Bob was a high school special education teacher and department chair at Henry Clay high school in Lexington Kentucky. He founded the first technology committee and co-wrote the technology plan. Bob has extensively modified an existing eCollege course for this class

Description: This course begins with what is a computer and ends with authoring original course content into an online course. In self-paced units participants gain exposure to the KVHS virtual tools as well as the pedagogy for their use. Participants will be furnished with their own virtual course to practice authoring original content material.

Intended Audience: K-12 Educators interested in developing online teaching and learning content.

Hardware & Software Required: Participants will need regular access to a computer that meets the KVHS minimum hardware requirements http://www.kvhs.org/index.real?action=Technical, a connection to the Internet, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher.

Prerequisite Skills Needed: Familiarity with the computer and ability to use email and the Internet.

Instructional Goal: This course will provide participants with an over view of online teaching and learning and the skills necessary to design and develop their own original course.

Intended Outcomes:

  • Participants will be able to author their own content into a virtual course
  • Participants will be able to use all the virtual tools found in the KVHS

Need Additional Information? Contact Bob Fortney with the KVHS and the course instructor at bfortney@kde.state.ky.us


Principal Selection Training for SBDM Council Members

Contact Hours: Participants receive 3.0 hours of EILA credit upon course completion.

Experienced Council Member Training Credit:  Experienced council members receive 3.0 hours of training credit upon course completion.

Cost: $70

Minimum Enrollment: 5 Maximum Enrollment: 30

Instructor: Kentucky Department of Education Staff

Instructor Bio: Cheri Meadows designed and developed this course.

Description: Course Description: Selecting a principal for their school is one of the most important tasks that a school council must accomplish. This online course is designed to assist school council members with the principal selection process and includes information on the legal requirements for principal selection, federal EEO laws, recruitment, the interview process, and qualities to look for in a principal.  

Intended Audience: School council members who will be selecting a principal and other stakeholders who want more information on the principal selection process in Kentucky.

Hardware & Software Required: Participants will need regular access to a computer that meets the KVHS minimum hardware requirements http://www.kvhs.org/index.real?action=Technical, a connection to the Internet, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher

Prerequisite Skills Needed: Familiarity with the computer and ability to use email and the Internet.

Intended Outcomes: The school council member will receive training and information in best practices for the interview process as per KRS 160.345 that results in a more effective and efficient interview process.

  • The school council member will receive training and information in best practices for principal recruitment as per KRS 160.345 that results in an understanding of the districts recruitment practices and the school council’s possible roles in supporting principal recruitment.

  • The school council member will review their own council policy for principal selection in light of applicable standards, current research and best practice around instructional leadership in schools resulting in a more effective and efficient principal selection process.

  • The school council member will review and revise as necessary the school council policy and process in relation to best practice for hiring a principal and legal requirements resulting in streamlined school council policies and practices.

  • The school council will implement an appropriate induction process for newly employed principals that result in increased support and success for the new principal and increased communication between the new principal and school council members.

  • The school council members will make a selection of a principal based on criteria that is likely to cause the school to meet academic improvement goals.

Need Additional Information? Contact Bob Fortney with the KVHS at bfortney@kde.state.ky.us or Course designer, Cheri Meadows at cmeadows@kde.state.ky.us  


Introduction to Consolidated Planning

Contact Hours: Participants receive 3.0 hours of EILA credit upon course completion.

Experienced Council Member Training Credit:  Experienced council members receive 3.0 hours of training credit upon course completion.

Cost: $70

Minimum Enrollment: 5   Maximum Enrollment: 20

Instructor: Kentucky Department of Education Staff

Description:  Consolidated Planning is a powerful process that can be used to focus the district and school's resources on the needs of students.  The goal of the Kentucky Department of Education is to assist schools as they use the planning process in schools and districts to provide effective schools for Kentucky students.

Consolidated Planning orientation covers the steps required to complete a Consolidated Plan, a review of the contents of the Consolidated Planning Guidebook, information on how the district Consolidated Plan fits together, major roles in Consolidated Planning, and how to do Implementation and Impact Checks and amendments to the budget portion of the plan.

Intended Audience: District CP Coordinators, Principals, and other stakeholders

Hardware & Software Required: Participants will need regular access to a computer that meets the KVHS minimum hardware requirements http://www.kvhs.org/index.real?action=Technical, a connection to the Internet, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher

Prerequisite Skills Needed: Familiarity with the computer and ability to use email and the Internet.

Intended Outcomes: As a result of the training, participants will:

  • Review the steps involved in consolidated planning
  • Become familiar with the Kentucky Consolidated Planning Guidebook
  • Become familiar with the parts of the consolidated plan 
  • Study the major roles in implementing the school or district plan
  • Determine how and when to monitor ongoing progress of the consolidated plan
  • Determine when to make adjustments and what triggers a formal plan amendment
  • Receive information about available resources on consolidated planning

Need Additional Information? Contact Bob Fortney with the KVHS at bfortney@kde.state.ky.us or Course designer, Cheri Meadows at cmeadows@kde.state.ky.us

 

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